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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-36
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-36
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 12 Feb 2020

Submitted as: research article | 12 Feb 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal WES.

The flow past a flatback airfoil with flow control devices: Benchmarking numerical simulations against wind tunnel data

George Papadakis1 and Marinos Manolesos2 George Papadakis and Marinos Manolesos
  • 1School of Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • 2College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK

Abstract. As wind turbines grow larger, the use of flatback airfoils has become standard practice for the root region of the blades. Flatback profiles provide higher lift and reduced sensitivity to soiling at significantly higher drag values. A number of flow control devices has been proposed to improve the performance of flatback profiles. In the present study, the flow past a flatback airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 1.5 × 106 with and without trailing edge flow control devices is considered. Two different numerical approaches are applied, Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES). The computational predictions are compared to wind tunnel measurements to assess the suitability of each method. The effect of each flow control device on the flow is examined based on the DES results on the finer mesh. Results agree well with the experimental findings and show that a newly proposed flap device outperforms traditional solutions for flatback airfoils. In terms of numerical modelling, the more expensive DES approach is more suitable if the wake frequencies are of interest, but the simplest 2D RANS simulations can provide acceptable load predictions.

George Papadakis and Marinos Manolesos

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George Papadakis and Marinos Manolesos

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The flow past a flatback airfoil with flow control devices: Benchmarking numerical simulations against wind tunnel data - Animations George Papadakis and Marinos Manolesos https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3662124

George Papadakis and Marinos Manolesos

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Latest update: 01 Apr 2020
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Short summary
Flatback airfoils are used in the root region of wind turbine blades since they have several structural and aerodynamic benefits. Several flow control devices are incorporated to mitigate the effects of vortex shedding in the wake of such airfoils. In this work, two different numerical approaches are compared to wind tunnel measurements to assess the suitability of each method in predicting the performance of the flow control devices in terms of loads and unsteady characteristics.
Flatback airfoils are used in the root region of wind turbine blades since they have several...
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