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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-71
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-71
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 14 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 14 Oct 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Wind Energy Science (WES).

Cross-contamination effect on turbulence spectra from Doppler beam swinging wind lidar

Felix Kelberlau1 and Jakob Mann2 Felix Kelberlau and Jakob Mann
  • 1NTNU, Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
  • 2DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark

Abstract. Turbulence velocity spectra are of high importance for the estimation of loads on wind turbines and other built structures, as well as for fitting measured turbulence values to turbulence models. Doppler beam swinging (DBS) wind lidars generate spectra that differ from spectra based on one-point measurements. Profiling wind lidars have several characteristics that cause these deviations, namely cross-contamination between the three velocity components, averaging along the lines-of-sight, and the limited sampling frequency. This study focuses on analyzing the cross-contamination effect. We sample wind data in a computer generated turbulence box to predict lidar derived turbulence spectra for three wind directions and four measurement heights. The data are then processed with the conventional method and with the method of squeezing. The results are analyzed and compared to turbulence velocity spectra from field measurements with a Windcube V2 wind lidar and ultrasonic anemometers as reference. We successfully predict lidar derived spectra for all test cases and found that their shape is dependent on the angle between the wind direction and the lidar beams. With conventional processing, cross-contamination affects all spectra of the horizontal wind velocity components. The method of squeezing improves the spectra to an acceptable level only for the case of the longitudinal wind velocity component and when the wind blows parallel to one of the lines-of-sight. The analysis of the simulated spectra described here improves our understanding of the limitations of turbulence measurements with DBS profiling wind lidar.

Felix Kelberlau and Jakob Mann
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Status: open (until 19 Dec 2019)
Status: open (until 19 Dec 2019)
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Felix Kelberlau and Jakob Mann
Felix Kelberlau and Jakob Mann
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Latest update: 22 Nov 2019
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Short summary
Wind speeds can be measured remotely from the ground with lidars. Their estimates are accurate for mean speeds, but turbulence leads to measurement errors. We predict these errors using computer-generated data and compare lidar measurements with data from a meteorological mast. The comparison shows that deviations depend on wind direction, measurement height, and wind conditions. Our method to reduce the measurement error is successful when the wind blows aligned with one of the lidar beams.
Wind speeds can be measured remotely from the ground with lidars. Their estimates are accurate...
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