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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-43
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-43
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 13 Aug 2019

Submitted as: research article | 13 Aug 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Wind Energy Science (WES) and is expected to appear here in due course.

RADAR-Derived Precipitation Climatology for Wind Turbine Blade Leading Edge Erosion

Frederick Letson1, Rebecca J. Barthelmie2, and Sara C. Pryor1 Frederick Letson et al.
  • 1Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
  • 2Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Abstract. Wind turbine blade leading edge erosion (LEE) is a potentially significant source of revenue loss for windfarm operators. Thus, it is important to advance understanding of the underlying causes, to generate geospatial estimates of erosion potential to provide guidance in pre-deployment planning and ultimately to advance methods to mitigate this effect and extend blade lifetimes. This study focusses on the second issue and presents a novel approach to characterizing the erosion potential across the contiguous USA based solely on publicly available data products from the National Weather Service dual-polarization RADAR. The approach is described in detail and illustrated using six locations distributed across parts of the USA that have substantial wind turbine deployments. Results from these locations demonstrate the high spatial variability in precipitation-induced erosion potential, illustrate the importance of low probability high impact events to cumulative annual total kinetic energy transfer and emphasize the importance of hail as a damage vector.

Frederick Letson et al.
Interactive discussion
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Frederick Letson et al.
Frederick Letson et al.
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Short summary
Wind turbine blade leading edge erosion (LEE) is potentially a significant source energy loss and expense for windfarm operators. This study presents a novel approach to characterizing LEE potential from precipitation across the contiguous USA based on publicly available National Weather Service dual-polarization RADAR data. The approach is described in detail and illustrated using six locations distributed across parts of the USA that have substantial wind turbine deployments.
Wind turbine blade leading edge erosion (LEE) is potentially a significant source energy loss...
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