Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2018-53
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research articles 06 Aug 2018

Research articles | 06 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Wind Energy Science (WES).

Towards the North Sea wind power revolution

Jens N. Sørensen1 and Gunner C. Larsen2 Jens N. Sørensen and Gunner C. Larsen
  • 1DTU Wind Energy, Fluid Mechanics, 2800 Lyngby, Denmark
  • 2DTU Wind Energy, Wind Turbine Loads and Control, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark

Abstract. The present work assesses the potential of a massive exploitation of offshore wind power in the North Sea by combining a meteorological model with a cost model that includes a bathymetric analysis of the water depth of the North Sea. The overall objective is to assess if the wind power in the North Sea can deliver the total consumption of electricity in Europe and to what prize as compared to conventional onshore wind energy. The meteorological model is based on the assumption that the exploited area is so large, that the wind field between the turbines is in equilibrium with the atmospheric boundary layer. This makes it possible to use momentum analysis to determine the mutual influence between the atmospheric boundary layer and the wind farm, with the wind farm represented by an average horizontal force component corresponding to the thrust. The cost model includes expressions for the most essential wind farm cost elements, such as costs of wind turbines, support structures, cables and electrical substations, as well as operation and maintenance as function of rotor size, interspatial distance between the turbines, and water depth. The numbers used in the cost model are based on previous experience from offshore wind farms, and is therefore somewhat conservative. The analysis shows that the lowest energy cost is obtained for a configuration of large wind turbines erected with an interspatial distance of about eight rotor diameters. A part of the analysis is devoted to assessing the relative costs of the various elements of the cost model in order to determine the components with the largest potential for reducing the cost price. As an overall finding, it is shown that the power demand of Europe, which is 0.4TW or about 3500TWh/year, can be fulfilled by exploiting an area of 190.000km2, corresponding to about 1/3 of the North Sea, with 100.000 wind turbines of generator size 13MW on water depths up to 45m at a cost price of about 7.5€cents/kWh.

Download & links
Jens N. Sørensen and Gunner C. Larsen
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 17 Sep 2018)
Status: open (until 17 Sep 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Jens N. Sørensen and Gunner C. Larsen
Jens N. Sørensen and Gunner C. Larsen
Viewed
Total article views: 101 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
64 35 2 101 0 0
  • HTML: 64
  • PDF: 35
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 101
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Aug 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Aug 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 101 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 101 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 15 Aug 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The work assesses the potential of a massive exploitation of offshore wind power in the North Sea by combining a meteorological model with a cost model including a bathymetric analysis of the water depth of the North Sea. As an overall finding, it is shown that the electrical power demand of Europe can be fulfilled by exploiting an area corresponding to about 1/3 of the North Sea with 100.000 wind turbines of generator size 13 MW on water depths up to 45 m to a cost price of about 7.5 €cents/kWh.
The work assesses the potential of a massive exploitation of offshore wind power in the North...
Citation
Share